Literary Look: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

My description:

The iconic moment in James Joyce’s novel in which Stephen sees the “bird” girl at the beach with her skirt tucked up has always reminded me of these fashionable tiered lace shorts. She is a symbol of the feminine in a sexually stifled and repressed society, so she would, in modern day, have a high-necked shirt to offset the bare legs, and I chose this blue to represent the “slate blue” skirts she had tucked and bundled around her. In the description, Stephen notices emerald seaweed that is clinging to her leg, so I added a bright green sandal, and pretty leaf earrings with both blue and green in them to combine the colors in this outfit. Her hair would be messy from the salty wind, but prettily put up.

From the book:

“A girl stood before him in midstream, alone and still, gazing out to sea. She seemed like one whom magic had changed into the likeness of a strange and beautiful seabird. Her long slender bare legs were delicate as a crane’s and pure save where an emerald trail of seaweed had fashioned itself as a sign upon the flesh. Her thighs, fuller and soft-hued as ivory, were bared almost to the hips, where the white fringes of her drawers were like feathering of soft white down. Her slate-blue skirts were kilted boldly about her waist and dovetailed behind her. Her bosom was as a bird’s, soft and slight, slight and soft as the breast of some dark-plumaged dove. But her long fair hair was girlish: and girlish, and touched with the wonder of mortal beauty, her face.”

Literary Look: Catcher in the Rye

My description:

Holden – if he were a girl today – would definitely still have his iconic red hat. He would want to seem brooding and tough, so a leather jacket would give him that vibe. Of course he would conform to skinny jeans – so phony – so he might rock these boyfriend jeans, which are a little more off-beat. I gave him some black high top Chucks because he is a kid after all, and would still have his sneakers.

From the book:

“I put on this hat that I’d bought in New York that morning. It was this red hunting hat, with one of those very, very long peaks. I saw it in the window of this sports store when we got out of the subway, just after I noticed I’d lost all the goddam foils. It only cost me a buck. The way I wore it, I swung the old peak way around to the back—very corny, I’ll admit, but I liked it that way. I looked good in it that way.”